Keeping Clean

More people die of illness than a disaster.
A large percentage of them through contracting waterborne or “insect” disaster diseases.
Yet not a lot is talked about them.

There is a simple priority list forming here.

    Clean water
    Safe Food
    Clean you
    Clean clothing
    Clean environment

Water speaks for itself.
It’s got to be clean and safe.
Once you are out of a potable water zone (industry cleaned water supply), you should NEVER drink anything you are 200% sure is safe.

Safe Food.
Starts with a clean you! WASH YOUR HANDS.
Used to supermarket food and a nice clean kitchen to prepare it in?
You may still have one BUT if you’ve no cooker, clean water, or even a kitchen, life gets hard fast.
Simple things like washing vegetables. 
Cleaning your pots and pans. preparing meat.

Want to cook rice?
First make your water safe.
Won’t cooking with it kill the germs off?
Probably not.

Twice the fuel, once to purify the water, once to cook with.
Then you’ve got to clean up your pots and pans. ANOTHER load of hot water!
 
Clean you.
Every morning you’ll probably toilet, have a wash, clean your teeth, men (and some girls) shave.
So everyday without fail you need to clean you.
Preferable when you have got up and before you go to bed.

Toileting brings about a MAJOR hygiene concern especially if you are sharing “facilities”.
TOILET PAPER,waste disposal, let alone keeping the porcelain clean.
Washing your hands before and afterwards.

Why before? What have you been doing?
If it’s a mucky job, you’re about to touch “intimate” parts of you with contaminated hands.

Hot purified water is needed to wash in.
Clean your teeth with non purified water and you may pay for it big time if not terminally.
Shaving? Don’t cut yourself using unclean water as you’ll main line the bugs straight into your blood supply.

Clean Clothing.
Stands to reason really. Dirt and smells attract bugs.
Dirt also destroys the insulation capabilities of your clothing.

Unkempt, scruffy appearance may be part of the Gray man persona BUT if you are looking for employment, a “squared away” person will get the job before some jerk with poor personal hygiene.

I’m not talking about creases in trousers but clean, free of marks, and kept in good repair says a lot.

Clean Environment.
Ever slept in a squat? I have yet it took me a while to realize that not all squats are equal.
The old settee might look comfortable but it’s full of body lice or bed bugs.
The mice droppings are a sign of danger, the dirty floor is a sign that filth is tracking into your bedroom.
Carpets are flea magnets, and toilets?
Don’t even go there.

In some squats I’ve gone outside to dig a hole than use the “facilities”.
Dig? Fold-able spade, toilet paper, washing you, and the spade afterwards.
Just a thought here, how many of you have squatted for a ‘POO’ lately?
Not easy especially if you are older or disabled.
Something to factor into your calculations.
A bit of practice I’m thinking.

So, how to wash.
Two depths, daily and deeply.

Daily.
It’s vital to look over your whole body. Any ticks need to be removed, cuts and abrasions cleaned and covered, any rashes or other problems discovered and dealt with.

Purify and heat water.
Clean your teeth, rinsing out with clean water (Spit into loo NOT your washing water).
Wash toothbrush.

You’ll need Toothbrush, toothpaste, any dental hygiene things like tooth picks.
Toothpaste?
At a pinch, salt works or Bicarbonate of Soda. One tub lasts for 4 months. You don’t need a lot. Tastes horrible but a cup of tea soon restores happiness.

Wash your face, underarms, genitals, and feet.
You’ll need soap, flannel, clean towel.
Soap?
I carry a travel bottle of liquid soap which I refill from a public toilet soap dispenser if all else fails.
Now shave in clean water. Why?
Your used wash water may contain bugs.
One nick, and you could get ill.
You’ll need a razor, spare blades, soap, nick stick to stop any bleeding.
Now comb or brush your hair.

Deeply.
You’ll need loads of purified water, preferably hot. 
Looking for a bath to stand in or a clean dustbin, or make a simple tarpaulin shower tray.

Start at the top.
Shampoo, sluicing the water all over you you’ll need a bowl to rinse out your hair.

Wash as before.
It’s vital to look over your whole body. Any ticks need to be removed, cuts and abrasions cleaned and covered, any rashes or other problems discovered and dealt with.

Deodorants.
It’s daft to use these.
At best they clog up your under arm pores which you cannot clean effectively without hot water.
The result is underarm and between the legs boils after a while.
A body smelling of soap is better AND more socially acceptable than trying to hide the stink of unwashed flesh.  Even baby powder clogs up the pores.

Your feet are different though.
ALWAYS dust your feet with a good anti fungal powder.
Keep them clean, dry, and healthy.
CHANGE YOUR SOCKS AND INSOLES IF THEY GET DAMP OR SMELLY.

Clothing.
Everyday, sponge off any marks.
You’ll need a face flannel or sponge BUT don’t use anything you wash your body with.
Repair any tears.
A quickie fix is to back a tear with duct tape. Then press the cloth onto the tape and with care, it can make for an almost invisible repair.

Check your seams.
Ticks, body lice, and bed bugs, love seams.

FOOTWEAR health is vital.
Keep them clean and polished.
It’s not vanity, clean polished footwear is generally waterproofed by the polish and muck doesn’t readily stick to it.

Keep footwear dry, and aired.
Dust your feet and shoes regularly to stop fungal infections.

Change your insoles if they wet wet or soiled.
That may necessitate carrying a couple of changes of insoles.

DON’T forget a good foot dusting powder and when ever possible,WEAR CLEAN DRY SOCKS.

Bedding.
Air your bedding EVERYDAY without fail.
If you have liners, air them too. That’s ALL items, your bag, your pillow, AND the liner.

A light dusting of Permethrin on the outside will help as will a dusting on your outer clothing.
Don’t forget, what you lay your bedding on may be unclean. Get used to putting a large groundsheet down first and dust it lightly to deter crawling bugs. 

Finally Cooking Gear.
You’ll probably be like me, a covered billy can with the lid used as a little frying pan.
I have a cereal bowl. Knife fork and spoon, and my trusty metal mug.

To keep then clean I use a green scourer (or preferably my stainless steel scourer pad) and a travel bottle full of liquid soap. I carry a travel bottle of liquid soap which I refill from a public toilet soap dispenser if all else fails. You’ve read that earlier and wondering why I’m using the same soap.
Soaps job is to cut through grease. That’s it.
It don’t matter if it’s expensive or cheap, that’s all soap does.
Posh stuff smells nicer but you’ll be rinsing your utensils off and drying them so smelly shouldn’t come into it.

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