Simpler than Morse

The tap or knock code has been round for ever.
Used by prisoners, kids, and anyone who can’t communicate verbally.

It works with anything from knocking on pipes to using whistles,  torches, or flags.

Simple to use but slower than Morse Code, each letter is made up of two elements
The left column and the right i.e. The letter W would be 5, 2

Unlike Morse, you need to leave definite gaps between the elements of the word and a bigger gap between the letters or the letter X as a separator.

1 2 3 4 5
1 A B C/K E F
2 G H I J K
3 L M N O P
4 Q R S T U
5 V W X Y Z

So  the sentence “Hello my name is Paul” translates to:-
**  ** / *  **** / *** * / *** * / *** ****/ ***** ***
*** **/ ***** ****/ ***** ***
*** ***/ * */ *** **/ * ****/ ***** ***
** ***/ **** ***/ ***** ***
*** *****/ * */ **** *****/ *** */ ***** ***
(Note the use of “X” or ***** *** as a letter separator).

Long and drawn out isn’t it compared to Morse code which would look / sound like:-
****   *   *-**   *-**   – – –
– –   -*- –
-*   *-  – –   *
**   ***
*- -*   *-   **-   *-**
(* is a dot, – is a dash, a dash is 3x longer than a dot)

Experienced tap and Morse users use abbreviations not unlike the universal text shorthand LOL (which stands for lots of laughs).
As for numbers? Tap talkers use a simple prompt like “nu” which changes to a standard count and “tp” to go back to the tap code.
Simple.

Advertisements
This entry was posted in prepping and tagged , , , . Bookmark the permalink.