Loadout

Interesting question I was asked, what is my fighting loadout?
My response was “what’s the transport?”

For instance many years ago my main transport was a VERY old 125 cc  motor bike (in hand painted OG):-
Loadout on this as I was driving down tracks and across fields?
A gas mask bag with the basics i.e. Slivovitz, water, cold tack (black bread and cheese mainly). My wet weather gear and camo net on the back seat, plus rifle with 100 rounds and a Browning 9mm (4 mags) and radio. Old school like me.

Some guys traveled even lighter i.e. they forewent the food but in all cases the Slivovitz was mandatory.

Then you look at now?
Hows about a Lada Riva 4×4 (old school version i.e. no fuel management still in hand painted OG). You could carry the kitchen sink in that (plumbed in, shower optional) if you liked and still be able to carry a full weapons load (and Slivovitz) whist driving down tracks that a billy-goat wouldn’t walk along.

A lot of time is spent talking about loadouts, bug outs, and pack weights but I still insist, look at the transport first before you decide.

Some will be thinking “take too much and what if the vehicle breaks down?”

Easy, leave the rubbish and walk away with the important things in life. After all you can replace anything except a good rifle and the Sliv’ works on toothache as well.

slivovitz

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6 Responses to Loadout

  1. wsmarble says:

    Excellent point. So many guys I know have the sort of inexplicable arsenal that cannot even be moved by any transport, let alone a transport you can reasonably keep in fuel during scarce times. So they’ll be fighting in place, to the bitter end. I like your common-sense approach to this, which has the collateral benefit of being more cost effective when times aren’t bad. Those other misguided guys almost NEED an apocalyptic disaster to justify having squandered all of the family’s resources on weaponry.

  2. equippedcat says:

    And keep it “modular”, so you can grab the most important stuff and go. You might not have time to sort through and repack your LBE (Load Bearing Equipment).

    • Problem I’ve always found with modular is duplication of equipment per module. That and money.

      I’m no where near rich enough to cover even ‘some’ of the scenarios in a modular way BUT when I was a ‘modular sort of guy’ I was still sorting and loving my book of lists i.e.
      Bag 1 for cleaning kit, bag 2 for the cork screw, etc.

      Sad isn’t it? (International Aid gratefully received).

      Now I just keep it light in the first place and scavenge for what I need thus there is no need to sort anything out leaving me spare cash for the important things in life like chocolate and even more Sliv’.

      As for the bulk i.e. all that other kit you lucky sods have?
      Landy trunk or whatever.
      With the notion of cache to collect after the fun.

      • equippedcat says:

        The concept of modular does not have any requirement for duplication; it can happen, but only if you want it to. The only extra money absolutely required would be for extra packaging. Here is an example:

        Start with a pocket-sized container with the small stuff which is also the most important. This would be Velcro’d or strapped to a pack with bigger, critical stuff, or in an easily accessible pocket on such a pack. The pack would then be in the vehicle with bigger or less important stuff, as well as replacements for the stuff in the pack (more food, water, ammo). For that matter, the stuff in the vehicle could (and probably should) be in containers to help with caching it for future access if circumstances allow. Preferably sorted by container. This could be by function (this one food, that one ammo, etc) or each could be a “x day supply” or even a mixture of these methodologies.

        I have duplication in my kits, because I want each to be able to stand on its own, even though the design is that each kit CAN be fit into a bigger kit; it just does not HAVE to be.

      • Good for you and happy it all works as advertised.
        Me, I’ll just continue to travel lightly and in hope as always.
        Adapting, improvising, and overcoming whatever problems I meet.
        Will that be enough? Probably not but it’ll be fun whilst it lasts.

        I have got one commendation though.
        A friend of the prospective SWMBO told her to keep me as I was useful.
        I was breaking into her car at the time with box strapping as she had locked it with her keys inside.
        Poor love, she listened to her friend!

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