Sharpening Systems update

A question has been asked about the wood block I use with a sharpening stone i.e. the sizes I use.

This from the article Sharpening system
Don’t forget, it’s also all about the angle you hold the blade to the stone.
cda28-protractor
Here are some common angles to use when holding your “blade” to a stone, glass, leather strop, or other sharpening medium i.e. diamond, carbide, carborundum.

Around 20 degrees is generally what I keep to and I use a simple  wood wedge cut to that angle as a guide. Don’t forget though, 20 strokes on one side needs 20 strokes to the other, the key is to keep things equal and don’t force the cut, a light even pressure. It takes time and patience.

The dimensions of the wood block I use.

The bench sharpening stone is 50mm wide.
The average depth of my camp / slicing blade 25 mm

woodblock

Block dimensions are:-
Camp knife:-
9 mm Deep, 25 mm base, which is nearly 19.8 degrees
For Slicing:-
7 mm Deep, 25 mm base, which is nearly 15.6 degrees
My Machete:-
15 mm Deep, 25 mm base, which is 31 degrees

Does it wear out quickly?
Sort of, yet provided the wear is linear on the base I only change it one a year.

My Kukri (aka Khukri) is a bit different when sharpening.

kukri
The angle of the blade is a series of  sweeping curves so VERY HARD to sharpen on a stone. Thus it is best to use a small finishing file or the blunted Chakmak (the little sharpener) as a “steel”.
DO NOT USE THE LITTLE KNIFE (Karda) for sharpening.
That’s kept for fine knife work.
Remember a kukri is a tool, NOT a fine blade BUT with a file applied to around 20 -22.5 degrees on both faces, I manage to create a sturdy edge suitable for most camp uses and dressing meat.

I still use the 9 mm wood block to angle the file correctly.
Having said that, to finish off the edge I also use a simple two grade hockey puck type carborundum stone or a fine round slip stone.
Don’t forget though, the steel of a kukri often isn’t as tough as it looks so it will dull with heavy use.

Advertisements
This entry was posted in prepping and tagged , , , . Bookmark the permalink.