Your neighbor, asset or threat?

nosyIt doesn’t matter where you live, your neighbor should either become a part of your security or positively tagged as a threat.

Does that seem a bit extreme?
Not to me as if someone is working for your good they are an asset, if not they are a threat to both your personal security and your safety.

So how would you find out which they are i.e. friend or foe?
It starts off with a basic Q&A with yourself which should include :-
What is your history and past interaction with them?
Have you had any problems (resolved or still ongoing)?
Are they just neighbors, acquaintances, or friends?
Are they people you spend leisure time with?
Are they helpful, TRUSTWORTHY, and RELIABLE?
Do you move within their groups of friends? Are they “OK”?
Are the neighbors and their friends like-minded with respect to the ideals of prepping?
How much do they REALLY know about you and how much of that is the truth or your ‘alter ego’ i.e. your GRAY MAN persona?
Which one do they know you as?

If you can’t answer any of the above without any shred of doubt, or even just have doubts, safety alone should change their status from asset to threat.

Discovery.
I’m not talking about blundering in saying “Hey I’m a prepper, what do you think about that?” That’s just plain stupid as is discussing your plans with anyone.

With thought and careful conversation you can generally work people out regarding their thoughts, values, trustworthiness, and reliability. Problem is it all takes time, care, and planning.

The label “Threat”.
Sounds extreme doesn’t it but I’m not talking building a wall between you and them or waging war. It’s all about you making a threat assessment. It can be useful to know where you stand.

For example.
The UK Police run anti terrorist hot lines [Source].
This website asks that you look out for the unusual – some activity or behaviour which strikes you as not quite right and out of place in your normal day to day lives. You may feel it’s probably nothing, but unless you trust your instincts and tell us we won’t be able to judge whether the information you have is important or not. Remember, no piece of information is considered too small or insignificant.

So, you being seen stockpiling foodstuff, fuel, PPE, medical supplies, etc, MAY give a “twitchy” or just plain nasty neighbor the excuse to draw unwelcome attention to you.

Yet am I only talking about the authorities? No, not at all.
After all the old signs of WW2 said “Careless talk costs lives”.

carelesstalk
It might not be your slip up
But that of your neighbor
That could literally cost you
Your freedom,
Or even YOUR LIFE

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7 Responses to Your neighbor, asset or threat?

  1. jlm990 says:

    Very well written and explained. I agree with you entirely about the friend Vs. foe concept. By foe I do not mean you would necessarily have to bust a cap in their backsides, but they could be a liability, as you say, with their mouth. Both in speaking, or perhaps wanting to fill it with your food.

  2. shtfprepper says:

    I know very little about my neighbors in my condo. Just the basics on a few. I’m cordial and will lend a hand if I see they need help of some kind ( I can’t help it ). I’d rather not share anything of prepper value (knowledge or anything else). I’ve already looked at angles and fields of fire. Of course, that last bit is in extreme & proven dangerous times.

    There is a good book called “The Survival Group Handbook” ( http://amzn.com/149965264X ) that helps you thru a number of activities and lessons in dealing with a mutual assistance/assisted group.

    • Thank you for the link yet I will only ever work “within us plus one” i.e. swmbo, me, and our life long friend.

      I don’t like groups as I personally can’t handle the politics or ideals of a group mentality.
      Funny how that has evolved when, in green, I would mix and match as required of me.
      As you know there is a trust and bond issue civilians just don’t get.

      There is a feel good factor that comes with knowing how the other person thinks and functions.

      What I would use outside of our core group would be likened to how I regard tools, useful but expendable.

  3. equippedcat says:

    Yes, you have to know your neighbors and what you can expect from them… now and in a disaster. If you don’t know them, consider having a “block party”.

    Once you “know” each other, you can casually drop into the conversation something like “Hey I read this article which suggests that xxx may happen, and they suggested stocking up on supplies for a couple of months. Do you think that might be a good idea, or is it just silly?” If they show interest, you can “work together to learn about it”. The idea being to never be perceived as “ahead” of them, but always “at the same point” or even better “a bit behind”.

    • A block party?
      Every party I’ve ever been too needs a host and I’m no host.
      Besides it take a very clever person to control an unknown group and I’m not that sort of person.

      Anyway we don’t need or want new friends for when the chips are down, just that threat assessment of an close, possible “problem”.

      As for the idea of using and cultivating an asset i.e. the neighbor?
      Nope, not interested.
      Being an asset does not make you our friend, just useful and not a threat.
      It does not mean we will support an asset beyond our own needs.
      As explained to shtfprepper, to me assets are like tools, useful but expendable.

      Cold, unfeeling reasoning? Yep.
      I’ll exploit, use, or even discard anything to ensure the survival of me and my own.
      My loyalty is exclusively to my own.

      • equippedcat says:

        Do you have to use your neighbor? Not if you don’t want to, or not if they won’t be of use.

        Do you need to be familiar with them? At least to the point where you have an idea how much of a threat they might be to you.

        Some people think partners are a good idea; some people don’t. To each their own.

  4. gamegetterII says:

    Well said!I’m with you on no large groups-other than our own family-heck we have 6 daughters that would end up coming to our house,along with assorted grandkids.
    There’s 2 out of the 6 husbands or boyfriends that I just might end up taking fishing and tossing ’em overboard with a couple of cement blocks tied to their feet-they’re that useless.
    The others are willing to help,and either know how to work on their own cars,or are willing to learn-and actually trying to learn from me-same with fixing stuff around their homes-4 are doing okay in that dept-the other two-I tell the girls to send ’em somewhere for a couple hours so I don’t hit ’em over the head with a wrench,or a 2×4,or nail their foot to the roof or….
    The two that are useless for about everything else just don’t grasp the concept that they may not be able to run up to the local grocery store or quickie mart if there’s some kind of disaster,SHTF, etc.- that’s why they would have to go away-too much of a drain on resources,and not capable of adding anything of value because they have no useful skills.

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