A note on Stitches

The post on The little things in life has raised conversation on wound closure.

From the GET GO I will say I don’t like stitching wounds although I have received training in using a sterile suture kit.

It’s fraught with danger as you may be “locking” in infection and don’t forget, even though things look clean doesn’t mean they are bug or contamination free!

There is an interesting document on the web titled PRIMARY SURGERY (not forgetting the hours of footage on You Tube) about sutures.

This document may not be a definitive guide like WTAND (Where there are no doctors) but I like it’s straight forward approach to “matters surgical”.

Still, judge for yourself.

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4 Responses to A note on Stitches

  1. shtfprepper says:

    Yeah, I took a stitching and stapling class along with other stuff. It’s definitely handy, but I think it will be like shooting a lot vs shooting a little. If you don’t practice, practice, practice, the skills will probably degrade sooner than you’d expect. Hell, my EMT classes are enough overload and I’m glad we’re not allowed to perform certain tasks!

    • Scoop and scoot. All but the most immediate of care eh?
      Probably a good thing too in this litigation mad world.
      AS said single use kit which on checking last night needs replacing as it’s slightly out of date (by a year).
      Shows how often I go into the 1st aid kit doesn’t it!

  2. gamegetterII says:

    As I said on the other post-I carry sutures for emergencies,for wounds that will not stay closed with butterflies or superglue-or the Dermabond brand medical grade superglue.
    I carry a half dozen saline syringes for wound irrigation,and a small bottle of Betadine to sterilize the wound-plus triple antibiotic ointment,along with mupirocin ointment for me-as I’m allergic to triple antibiotic and all 3 active ingredients in the stuff.
    The only time I’ve ever used them was on myself-we were on a canoe trip and at least 5 days from any town. I had cut my finger to the bone on a hatchet that was stuck into a log that I had tripped over-yes alcohol was involved-the bleeding didn’t stop overnight-so we cleaned the cut out
    dumped peroxide in it,flushed with water that had been filtered,boiled then cooled. One of the guys with us was an Army medic,and he had a huge first aid bag,even had novacaine with him-he did the actual suturing,when we got to the next town,a Dr. looked at and said leave it be-go see your regular Dr. in ten days or so. Left a barely visible scar.
    That canoe trip-way back in the 1970’s is why I carry sutures. Back then there was no such thing as the single use packets I have now-suture and needle all ready to go. The packets only was a couple ounces total for a few of them-and a hemostat,or even the pliers on a multi-tool will work as a needle driver-if you’re worried about the 4-6oz a needle driver weighs.

    • Historically I’ve always carried zinc oxide tape as an immediate wound closer.
      That was until I discovered the joys of DUCT TAPE.
      OK I’ve got my suture kit but now, a quick flush to get the cr#p out, tip the contents of a sugar wrap into the wound and slap on a plaster or a square of gauze and seal the whole lot in duct tape until I can settle down and do it proper.
      I learned about sugar from an old poacher, confirmed it’s value by reading up on it, and low and behold even the NHS is using it now. Since using that I’ve never had an infected wound!

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