Altmuligmann, Handyman.

Nok en gang en altmuligmann.
Only this time it’s disconnecting and removing an old split plastic 220 lb domestic furnace oil tank from a 3 foot high platform. Easy eh? Just Push!!

arghyell
No, a controlled lift down is called for as it is sat directly opposite a hell of a lot of GLASS!

Then the ground work and platform needed extending by 18 inches to accommodate the new longer tank, and the VERY HEAVY 360 lb bunded tank (that comes delivered and strapped to a standard wood pallet), needs mounting and connecting up.

oiltank

Only here’s the crunch, the equipment list.
A dozen medium density blocks (17 x 8 x 4 inch),
A couple of 4 foot concrete lintels,
A 20 inch square 2 inch thick paving slab,
Two 12 inch lengths of 2 x 2 inch fencing posts,
A seasoned plank (12 inches wide, 1 inch thick, and 5 feet long),
My little car bottle jack with a magnificent lift of 6 inches,
NO ROPE!

And the help of someone who can’t touch his toes let alone lift a lot.

Care to have a stab on how to do it?
How to carry out a controlled lift of the old one to the ground and the new one up into place? I’ll give you a clue, you’ll need maths to use the 6 inch lift jack.

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5 Responses to Altmuligmann, Handyman.

  1. Rifleman III says:

    Dunnage, old man. Four inch wood. Raise the jack the length of travel (6-inches). Slide 4-inch board under. Then a 2-inch board under the jack and lift to length of travel. Slide another 4-inch board under. Repeat using 2-inch and 4-inch boards under the jack, and 4-inch boards under the load.
    Similar process is how we lift houses here on the coastline. Same principle.

    Bellow out to SWMBO, “Come on with it! We haven’t all day!” (while sipping iced tea in this blasted heat and humidity).

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